Greater Essex Elementary Teachers' Federation of Ontario

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Anti-Bullying Books

Books Building Brains to Butt out Bullies - an initiative by the Public Relations Committee

These books are now in each school library.

The Bully Blockers Club by Teresa Bateman
The Bully Blockers Club by Teresa Bateman
Lotty Raccoon is excited to start the school year. She has a new teacher, shoes, and a backpack. But when Grizzly Grant begins to bully, her enthusiasm wanes. She tries different methods to make him stop, and initiates a club for other tormented targets.


 

 

Say Something by Peggy Moss
Say Something by Peggy Moss
A girl stands silent when classmates are bullied, then learns her lesson when no-one helps her when she is attacked. Illustrations reflect a diverse student population. This book eloquently explores a common trend in today's schools, and suggests a worthy solution - say something.




Is It Because? by Tony Ross
Is It Because? by Tony Ross
What makes Peregrine Ffrogg a bully? A boy and his dog wonder why Ffrogg constantly gives them trouble. Is it his name, or that he looks like a dog? A story to soothe the hurts of bullies and the bullied.





Missing Matthew by Kristyn Dunnion
Missing Matthew by Kristyn Dunnion
Matthew Stein is a recent arrival in a small town where nobody gets involved in anyone else's business. His presence and absence at school is really only noted by Matthew, a member of the Rebel Squad and the bullies who taunt him daily. When Matthew goes missing, the Rebel Rescue Squad makes his case a priority, and it is they who discover that most of the assumptions made about his disappearance are wrong. It turns out that the mystery that lies at the center of the adult relationship in the town is also key to the mystery surrounding Matthew. Hilarious and thoughtful, this novel from a new author will charm readers with its insight into the lives of children.

Stitches by Glen Huser
Stitches by Glen Huser
When Travis finally begins junior high, some things in his life get better, but others get much worse. Travis is a different kind of kid, and at his age different does not go over well with one's peers. He lives with his eccentric aunt and uncle in a trailer full of little kids, his best friend is disabled and lives with her wild biker brothers, and to make him an even bigger target, he dreams of being a puppeteer. Now surviving the nasty taunts and attacks of bullies has become a part of his every day reality. Will things erupt into violence before the play is complete? Winner of the 2003 Governor General Award for Children's Literature.

Dork on the Run by Carol Gorman
Dork on the Run by Carol Gorman
Dorks and cool kids alike should get ready to resume rooting for this irresistible underdog whose foray into the perplexing politics of a middle school election are as insightful as they are hilarious. Jerry Flack is running against Gabe, an opponent willing to go to any lengths to win the election. While Jerry handles the abuse of his tormentor, a subplot about a third grader who is bullying his little sister is integrated into the novel. In both cases, children will react to the treatment of the Flacks and to the way they deal with being the object of such unwanted attention.

Owen Foote, Frontiersman by Stephanie Greene
Owen Foote, Frontiersman by Stephanie Greene
Nobody could love the woods more than Owen Foote, except maybe his idol Daniel Boone or his best friend Joseph. In this story, Owen builds a treehouse in a neighbour's woods and discovers how to overcome bullies with his brains and the support of this family.




My Dog, Cat by Marty Crisp
My Dog, Cat by Marty Crisp
In contemporary suburbia, fourth-grade Abbie dog-sits for his aunt's Yorkshire terrier. Already picked on by the school bully, he hates the thought of escalated teasing when out in public with a sissy dog. However, bonding begins when he rescues Catullus from being dressed as a doll and, of course, boy and dog are totally attached at book's end when Cat catches a robber and stands up to the bully and his Akita. The tale is sweet, if predictable. True dog lovers will enjoy the story, as well as the advice on dog shopping in the afterword.

Who The Man by Chris Lynch
Who The Man by Chris Lynch
At 13, Earl is bigger and physically more mature than the other kids in his school, and he doesn't hesitate to use violence to handle conflicts. His tough-talking father actually eggs him on and encourages him to take care of himself. The novel follows a week in the boy's life after he has been suspended from school for fighting. In a rhythmic first-person narration, Lynch gets inside the head of the type of student who exists in many schools-the misunderstood kid whose confusion and anger gets him pegged as a brute and a bully, yet hidden beneath are layers of sensitivity, vulnerability, and loneliness. Readers are privy to Earl's confused thoughts about his parents, religion, his one friend, and an older girl on whom he has a crush. During that same week, he shows the first inklings of a new understanding of the world, learning that most situations are not black and white, and right and wrong are not defined in terms of absolutes.